where were the hoary hosts of hoggoth? (a review of dr. strange)

FINALLY, I SAW IT—Dr. Strange, the movie. I say “finally” as I am one of the dying breed of guys who bought and collected Marvel comic books in the ’60s as the magic was happening. (And by the Hoary Hosts of Hoggoth, face facts: it was almost exclusively guys who read superhero comics at the time.) And Dr. Strange was always one of my faveravest titles! As I am not a movie reviewer, I didn’t sit through a “special screening.” We bought our overpriced tickets for a Friday matinée ($9 each, and that’s with a senior discount!) and bought… Continue Reading where were the hoary hosts of hoggoth? (a review of dr. strange)

art spiegelman’s very strange comic strip

I SAW THE ADS FOR WITZEND in late 1966 or early ’67, probably in the Rocket’s Blast Comics Collector. RBCC was the first fanzine that I bought in the ’60s; it was an adzine that featured articles on comics and ads from dealers and collectors offering stuff for sale. I sent my dollar bill off to some strange address in New York and eagerly awaited an entire publication by my faveravest artist, Wally Wood. 1 I waited for months and what I finally received was Witzend 2 with a note of apology from Woody in the mailing envelope. The… Continue Reading art spiegelman’s very strange comic strip

the revelations of basil wolverton will keep you awake at night

BASIL WOLVERTON WAS AN IDIOSYNCRATIC ARTIST from the beginning. Wherever he found a publisher, his work stood out from all other comic book artists of the 1950s. His outlandish style was best suited for a form of what used to be referred to as ‘bigfoot humor’ (which had something to do with Lil’ Abner, nothing to do with Sasquatch). But the work that attracts the most attention from collectors is his science fiction strips for secondary comic book publishers. I had been aware of Wolverton since the early ’60s: his art popped up in old comic books and Mad paperback… Continue Reading the revelations of basil wolverton will keep you awake at night

addicted to marvel tales annual 1 (marvel comics 1964 part 2)

This article is one of twenty-four ‘book reviews’ addressing my introduction to and immediate addiction to Marvel superhero comics in the summer of 1964. Before reading this, I recommend that you read the first part, “addicted to marvel comics 1964,” which provides the background for the what follows here and subsequent articles. These twenty-four individual parts will be pieced together into one article under the original title of “addicted to marvel comics 1964.” I was just shy of 13-years old at the time, a perfect age to be smitten with the wonders provided by the Marvel bullpen. I had been reading comic books for years… Continue Reading addicted to marvel tales annual 1 (marvel comics 1964 part 2)

addicted to marvel comics 1964 part 1

Like so many Americans of the Baby Boomer generation, I grew up reading comic books. In fact, comic books have been a part of my life for so long that I can’t recall ever having not read them. At first, it was Walt Disney Comics & Stories and other Dell type funnybooks—and funnybooks as said and meant by parents was one word. Then came Superman and Batman and the Flash and Gold Key movie adaptations and even Classics Illustrated. While DC’s art was uniformly excellent (for comic books): such standouts as Gil Kane, Carmine Infantino, and Murphy Anderson did fine work year after year. Fine… Continue Reading addicted to marvel comics 1964 part 1

a zen fable by fred schrier

I DON’T MUCH LIKE MUCH OF THE ARTWORK that is considered psychedelic that has been done since the ’80s. For me, the perfection of modern psychedelic art loses the kinesthesia of the acid experience and leaves me (and that is me by my “i”-less self living my Zen fable) devoid of any cosmic-consciousness resonance (my term). 1 An exception—and there may be MANY exceptions ODF which I am unaware—is the artist who signs his work “ekislev.” And the guy is a blewdy ‘digital artist’ to boot! 2 Finally, the book Psychedelic Art by Robert and Masters and Jean Houston (1968) is a great… Continue Reading a zen fable by fred schrier