blmf literary saloon (where used books come to be found)

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BLMF LITERARY SALOON
1501 Pike Place
Suite 324
Seattle WA 98101

 

PHONE
206-621-7894

 

HOURS
Monday-Sunday 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM

 


 

Photo of interior of BLMF Literary Saloon bookstore in Seattle.

“Looking for poems written by cats? A Star Wars travel guide? Maybe a book on how to survive a sharknado? You can find those and more at BLMF Literary CONTINUE READING

new mom-and-pop, brick-and-mortar book store opens in redmond

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THE U.S. CENSUS of 2010 uncovered several dozen full-time book-lovers among the 59,000 residents of Redmond, Washington. Like most such readers, these residents required a regular intake of new and old books, and while some of their needs were filled by the King County Library System’s branch in Redmond, other needs have gone sorely lacking.CONTINUE READING

posting online ain’t the same as being in print

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REGARDING POSTING ONLINE, in response to having the official Elvis Presley website at Graceland picking up one of my articles—which I trumpeted loudly to family and friends via Facebook and email—my friend Stephanie Locke posted a nice comment on my A Touch Of Gold site: “Good to see Umphred back in print.”

Instead of simply CONTINUE READING

pangur bán and the nameless monk

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EVERYBODY KNOWS what a coincidence is: “The occurrence of events that happen at the same time by accident but seem to have some connection”—at least according to Merriam-Webster. But of course it’s not that simple: ‘real’ coincidences not only catch our attention, they resonate with us.

Real coincidences seem to ‘mean something,’ even if that CONTINUE READING

philosophical mutts and zen master cats

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GUARDIANS OF BEING is a collaboration between Eckhart Tolle (words) and Patrick McDonnell (pictures). I have enthused over it since its publication in 2009, and have recommended it to everyone! The book describes beautifully and playfully how philosophical mutts and zen master cats help in grounding human beings—call us out of our reveries, our worries, CONTINUE READING

did he just say something sacrilitigious?

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FACEBOOK GETS MY ATTENTION in the early morning hours as I sip my coffee and wait for that part of my brain/mind that ratiocinates to kick into gear. I scroll through my timeline and when an interesting image catches my attention, I read it, and sometimes chime in. I try to be positive and humorous: CONTINUE READING

hermits cranks pseudoscience and martin gardner

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MARTIN GARDNER WAS A SKEPTIC. He was one of the first ‘modern skeptics’ and one of the most important. He made his livelihood as a mathematics and science writer. He is perhaps best known for creating and sustaining general interest in recreational mathematics for a large part of the 20th century through CONTINUE READING

and some other elements of typography

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IN MY PREVIOUS POST,robert bringhurst and the elements of typographic style,” addressed the poetry that the author brought to his lengthy treatise on the history and importance of typography. If Bringhurst’s prose did not completely hook you but at least piqued your interest in type, then read on, so that I may CONTINUE READING

another example of what not to do when publishing

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EXAMPLES OF what not to do when publishing your work comes in published form all the time and I thought I would pass this one on as another note for writers. I received this bit of spam this morning and just thought that I would pass it on as a lesson in how not to CONTINUE READING

mark twain on the united states as a Christian country

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MARK TWAIN seems to have had something to say about anything and everything, and except for his belief that Will Shakespeare was not the author of anything that bore his name, I tend to agree with the old curmudgeon about everything and anything—including his take on certain citizens of these here United States assuming that CONTINUE READING

yossarian lives! (and he’s an octogenarian)

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I JUST FOUND THIS GROOVY ARTICLE titled “Catch-22: A Paradox Turns 50 And Still Rings True,” by Lynn Neary for NPR Books and thought, “Holy Minderbinder! It’s Yossarian’s birthday and I almost forgot!” I thought this because I saw the October in the article’s dateline and registered it as for this October. CONTINUE READING

a roaring of tense colors and interlacing of opposites (on dada)

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THERE IS A LITERATURE that does not reach the voracious mass. It is the work of creators, issued from a real necessity in the author, produced for himself. It expresses the knowledge of a supreme egoism, in which laws wither away.

Every page must explode, either by profound heavy seriousness, the whirlwind, poetic frenzy, the CONTINUE READING

anomalous stories incongruous places

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STEPHEN JAY GOULD. I can’t recall what first attracted me to him, but it was a long time ago. The first book of his that I remember reading was The Flamingo’s Smile – Reflections In Natural History from 1985. What a delightful title for a book of essays on the smileful (have I just coined CONTINUE READING

sherlock holmes on the acquisition of knowledge

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“I CONSIDER THAT A MAN’S BRAIN originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best CONTINUE READING

lewis carroll and an elementary lesson on making a request

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MANY GOOD STORIES are good, but not necessarily so, even in an elementary way. For example:

“An old story has it that Queen Victoria was so enchanted with Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland that she asked its author to be sure to send her his next work.

So he did: it was An Elementary Treatise On CONTINUE READING

hugo ball and sound poetry (o gadji beri bimba)

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HUGO BALL’S SOUND POETRY may seem a mere stringing of words together to many readers or listeners. It is a form of verse without words. “Sound poetry is an artistic form bridging literary and musical composition in which the phonetic aspects of human speech take the foreground instead of the more conventional semantic and CONTINUE READING